Advanced Playing The Game

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Master Table

Take a look at the 4C Advanced System Master Table; it is the key to all actions in the game. To use the Master Table, find the appropriate Rank Value in the leftmost column, roll d%, and find your die result on the table by moving along the row. The number rolled will be in a black, red, blue, or yellow box which will give you the result:

Color Result
Black Failed Attempt. Your action has failed.
Red Minor Success. Your action succeeded, but just barely; in most instances this will be enough.
Blue Success. You have succeeded at your attempted action.
Yellow Major Success. You have succeeded in a spectacular way. Some actions, as determined by the Gamemaster, will require a Major Success.

Row Steps

A Row Step represents a shift of one or more rows up or down the Master Table in the effective Rank Value for a single action. A Row Step can be a bonus or penalty. For example, a +1 Row Step moves the effective Rank Value to the next higher row (i.e. from 20-29 to 30-39) while a –2 Row Step moves the effective Rank Value two rows lower (i.e. from 20-29 to 6-9).

Example: Jessica’s character is trying to hit an opponent with a karate chop. The Gamemaster tells Jessica her character gains a +1 Row Step bonus due to favorable circumstances (see p. 00). Her character has a Melee Rank Value of 30-39, so for this one attack the bonus brings it to 40-49.

Altering The Dice

After a roll is made you may spend 25 points from Fortune to shift the result of a single roll one color left or right (from black to red, red to blue, blue to yellow, or vice-versa) on the Master Table. The roll you alter can be your own or someone else’s (ally or enemy). You may spend additional points to further shift the color (i.e. from black to blue or red to black) with each additional shift costing a further 25 points. Multiple characters may spend Fortune to affect the same die roll.

Example: Tony wants to reduce the result of an opponent’s roll from blue to black. This costs 50 points (two Color Shifts), but Tony’s character only has 37 points. Thus Tony can do no better than to shift it from blue to red (one Color Shift); the opponent still succeeds, but less so and Tony has 12 points remaining in his Fortune.

Combat

Combat in 4C takes place in turns, each of which covers an abstract amount of time equal to the action depicted in a single comic book panel. A character can perform any action that would fit into a standard panel including attack, dodge, or move. You may only attack once in a turn (the exception is the Fast Attack power which grants characters the ability to make multiple attacks in one turn). It is possible to move and attack in the same turn but you suffer a –1 Row Step penalty to your attack for every sector you move into unless you perform a rush (see p. 00). You may also move and dodge in the same turn but you suffer a –1 Row Step penalty to your dodge for every sector you move into.
During a turn the action takes place as follows:

  1. The Gamemaster secretly determines the actions of Gamemaster Characters.
  2. The players each state their actions for the turn.
  3. One player and the Gamemaster each roll d% to determine Initiative for their side; highest roll wins.
  4. The side that won Initiative acts.
  5. The side that lost Initiative now acts.
  6. Repeat until the combat is over.

Optional Rule: Initiative Bonus

Each turn each side adds the highest Rank Value of Awareness of its members to the Initiative roll.

Example: The highest Gamemaster Character Awareness Rank Value is 20 while the highest player character Awareness Rank Value is 50; the Gamemaster adds 20 to the Gamemaster Characters’ Initiative roll while the player rolling for the player characters adds 50 to the Initiative roll.

Movement

4C games are played on a map divided into individual areas known as sectors. The number of sectors a character may move in a turn is determined by the Rank Value of Coordination.

Rank Value Sectors Moved in One Turn
01-02 1 sector
03-29 2 sectors
30+ 3 sectors

Climbing: The above table assumes a character moving horizontally along the ground; if the character is moving vertically (i.e. climbing a wall) use the following:

Rank Value Sectors* Climbed in One Turn
01-29 1 sector
30+ 2 sectors

( * One sector is approximately 10 feet.)

Some powers grant characters special forms of movement. See the individual power descriptions (starting on p. 00) for details.

In addition to moving across sectors on the map (either through walking, running, or climbing), characters may also swim and characters that move for an extended period of time may suffer the effects of exhaustion.

Swimming

Without a special power or device, a character moves only a single sector each turn when swimming. A character that sinks may hold his breath for a number of turns equal to his Fortitude Rank Value; after that point the character must roll d% on the Master Table using the character’s Fortitude Rank Value:

Color Result
Black You are dying (see p. 00).
Red You are winded; your Fortitude Rank Value drops by one Row Step.
Blue No effect.
Yellow No effect.

The character must continue rolling once each turn, with a cumulative -1 Row Step penalty to his Fortitude Rank Value for each turn since he started drowning, until he reaches breathable air.

Exhaustion

A character can move for a number of turns equal to the Rank Value of his Fortitude before he runs the risk of suffering from exhaustion. The character must roll d% on the Master Table using the character’s Fortitude Rank Value:

Color Result
Black You collapse and must rest for 3-30 turns.
Red You collapse and must rest for 2-20 turns.
Blue No effect.
Yellow No effect.

The character must continue rolling once each turn – at a -10 penalty to his Fortitude Rank Value for each turn since he started drowning – until he rests for 10 turns.

Melee Attacks

Hitting, kicking, stabbing, slashing, etc. are all types of melee attacks. To resolve a melee attack, determine whether or not it is a Bashing or Slashing attack.
Bashing: Any unarmed attack with fists or feet or an attack with a blunt weapon or object is a Bashing attack. Roll d% on the Master Table using your Melee Rank Value and compare the result to the following table:

Color Result
Black Miss. You whiff.
Red Hit. See Damage on p. 00.
Blue Pound. Your opponent suffers damage and may be knocked down (possibly into an adjacent sector). See p. 00.
Yellow Concuss. Your opponent suffers damage and may be knocked out. See p. 00.

Slashing: Any attack with a knife, sword, or other sharp object is a Slashing attack. Roll d% on the Master Table using your Melee Rank Value and compare the result to the following table:

Color Result
Black Miss. Nothing but air.
Red Hit. See Damage on p. 00.
Blue Concuss. Your opponent suffers damage and may be knocked out.. See p. 00.
Yellow Dying. You’ve fatally wounded your opponent. See p. 00.

Ranged Attacks

Includes shooting a firearm and throwing a weapon or object, in short any attack across a distance is a ranged attack. Roll d% on the Master Table using your Coordination Rank Value and compare the result to the following table:

Color Result
Black Miss. Wild shot.
Red Hit. See Damage on p. 00.
Blue Nail. You’ve hit your target; if you did not declare you were trying for the Nail then this is a Hit. See p. 00.
Yellow Dying. You’ve fatally wounded your opponent. See p. 00.

Range: Weapons are limited in range as follows:

Weapon **Range (In Sectors) **
Bow 4
Crossbow 4
Pistol 4
Rifle 8
Shotgun 2
Thrown Object 1 sector per row on the Master Table starting with Rank Value 6-9; lower Rank Values can only throw an object in the same sector.
Power 1/10 the Rank Value of the power (round up)

Optional Rule: Range Penalty

Count the number of sectors from the attacker to the target ignoring the attacker’s sector but including the target’s sector. For each sector the attacker suffers a -1 Row Step penalty to the effective Rank Value of Coordination for this attack.

Rushing

To rush an opponent you must meet the following conditions:

  • The opponent cannot be in the same sector as you.
  • You must be able to reach the opponent in one turn.

If these two conditions are met you roll d% on the Master Table using your Fortitude Rank Value and gaining a +1 Row Step for each open sector you move into. Compare the result to the following table:

  • Black: Miss. You run right past.
  • Red: Hit. See Damage on p. 00.
  • Blue: Pound. Your opponent suffers damage and may be knocked down (possibly into an adjacent sector). See p. 00.
  • Yellow: Concuss. Your opponent suffers damage and may be knocked out.. See p. 00.

Wrestling

Grabbing, choking, holding, and similar attacks are all covered under wrestling. Roll d% on the Master Table using your Brawn Rank Value and compare the result to the following tables:
Seizing: Use this when you want to grab something out of an opponent’s grasp.

Color Result
Black Miss. You grab at air.
Red Miss. Not quite.
Blue Snatch. You’ve grabbed the target of your seize attempt. See p. 00.
Yellow Shatter. You’ve grabbed the item but broke it. See p. 00.

Slipping: Use this when you’re being held by an opponent.

Color Result
Black Fail. You’re still held.
Red Fail. Just for a second …, but no.
Blue Elude. You’ve escaped. See p. 00.
Yellow Turnabout. You’ve not only escaped but can also reverse the hold. See p. 00.

Struggling: Use this when you want to grab an opponent and restrain the character.

Color Result
Black Fail. Not even close.
Red Fail. Just out of reach.
Blue Hold. You’ve successfully grappled your opponent. See p. 00.
Yellow Hold. You’ve successfully grappled your opponent. See p. 00.

Dodging

Roll d% on the Master Table using your Coordination Rank Value and compare the result to the following table:

Color Result
Black Fail. Not quick enough.
Red 3 Row Step. Anyone attacking you this turn suffers a -3 Row Step penalty to the appropriate Trait.
Blue 6 Row Steps. Anyone attacking you this turn suffers a -6 Row Step penalty to the appropriate Trait.
Yellow 9 Row Steps. Anyone attacking you this turn suffers a -9 Row Step penalty to the appropriate Trait.

Block

Sometimes it’s necessary to stop Brawn with Brawn. When blocking, roll d% on the Master Table using your Brawn Rank Value and compare the result to the following table:

Color Result
Black Fail. Your block attempt has no effect.
Red 1 Row Step. For purposes of damage, the Rank Value of the attacker’s Brawn suffers a -1 Row Step penalty.
Blue 4 Row Steps. For purposes of damage, the Rank Value of the attacker’s Brawn is reduced by 3 row steps.
Yellow 7 Row Steps. For purposes of damage, the Rank Value of the attacker’s Brawn is reduced by 6 row steps.

Catching

There are times when a character must catch something (a falling civilian, a thrown object, etc.) When catching, roll d% on the Master Table using your Coordination Rank Value and compare the result to the following table:

Color Result
Black Fail. You miss. If it was an object being thrown to harm you, such as a weapon, you’re automatically hit.
Red Fail. You’ve missed.
Blue You catch, but possibly harm, it. You must make a second d% roll on the Master Table using Coordination; any result less than Blue means what you caught suffers damage equal to the Rank Value of your Brawn.
Yellow Perfect catch. Good job!

Evade

Similar to dodging (see p. 00), except it applies to melee combat only, Evade is the act of weaving and bobbing to avoid an attack. Roll d% on the Master Table using your Melee Rank Value and compare the result to the following table:

Color Result
Black Fail. Not only did you fail but you moved into the exact spot your opponent was attacking; your opponent automatically hits you.
Red Evade. You successfully evade the attack and are unharmed.
Blue Superior Evade. Not only did you successfully evade the attack but you’ve also maneuvered yourself into an enviable position; on the next turn you gain a +1 Row Step bonus to your Melee roll to attack the opponent that you just evaded.
Yellow Maximum Evade. As blue but your bonus is +2 Row Steps.

Waiting

A character that wins initiative (see p. 00) may choose to wait before acting, allowing opponent(s) to act first and then interrupting and taking an action at the best possible moment. For example, a character planning a ranged attack against an opponent may wait for that opponent to move closer (reducing the penalty associated with ranged attacks, see p. 00).

Attacking Multiple Targets at Once

When surrounded by multiple opponents in a single sector a character may elect to attack everyone at once. Roll to attack but on a Yellow result everyone is affected as if the result was Red. Any result less than Yellow is a complete miss. This only works with melee attacks.

Damage

Any successful hit inflicts damage that is subtracted from your Damage total. When your Damage points are reduced to 0, you are Dying (see p. 00). The amount of damage an attack inflicts depends on what type of attack it is:

  • Melee Attack: Inflicts an amount of damage equal to the Rank Value of the attacker’s Brawn if weaponless; a one-handed weapon adds +5 points and a two-handed weapon adds +10 points.
  • Ranged Attack: Inflicts a number of points of damage equal to the Material Value of the item thrown. The following is a small selection of possible objects.
Item Thrown Material Value
Concrete Block 20
Steel Beam 30
Compact Car 40
Pickup Truck 50

If the attack was with a weapon it inflicts a number of points of damage as follows:

Weapon Damage
Bow 10
Crossbow 10
Pistol 10
Rifle 15
Shotgun 25

Armor: Reduces the amount of damage suffered in an attack by subtracting the armor’s Rank Value from the amount of damage inflicted; any remaining points are then subtracted from Damage.
Example: A character wearing armor with a Rank Value of 10 hit by a punch dealing 20 points of damage suffers only 10 points of damage to Damage.

Pulling Your Punch: You can choose to mitigate the damage done by any of your attacks. Prior to attacking you state the reduced amount of damage your attack can cause and/or the level of success it can achieve. If your attack hits it does the reduced damage and if your level of success was greater than your limit, the success if reduced to your limit.

Example: Gina does not want her pistol-wielding character to kill an opponent so she states her character is pulling her punch with the pistol (shooting in a non-vital area) limiting the attack’s damage to a Nail result; if Gina’s d% roll achieves a Dying result, it is reduced to Nail instead.

Material Value of Common Substances

Sometimes the strength of an object will come into play. In such instances, use the following table as a point of reference:

Material Value Substance
1-2 Paper
3-5 Plastic
6-9 Aluminum
10-19 Brick
20-29 Concrete
30-39 Stone
40-49 Iron
50-74 Steel
75-99 Diamond
100+ Magical or alien substance

Combat Results

The following is a listing of the various combat results mentioned previously.
Concuss: Compare the Rank Values of the attacker’s Brawn to the defender’s Fortitude. If the attacker’s Rank Value is greater than the defender’s the defender must roll d% on the Master Table using his Fortitude and compare the result to the following table:

Color Result
Black The defender is knocked unconscious for 1d10 turns. The defender loses all Fortune points and can do nothing until regaining consciousness at which point the defender immediately recovers a number of Fortune points equal to the Rank Value of Fortitude.
Red No effect.
Blue Same as Red.
Yellow Same as Red.

Errata?

See the Errata page for a discussion on whether Concuss requires errata.

Dying: You are dying. Your Damage points drop to 0 and your Fortitude Rank Value drops by one Row Step on the Master Table at the end of each turn until it reaches Rank Value 0, at which point you are dead. Once you’ve reached Rank Value 01-02 you can stabilize yourself by spending 10 Fortune points each turn.
If you receive aid before you die, meaning someone spends a full turn tending to your wounds, you automatically stabilize; your Damage points remain at 0 but your Fortitude Rank Value stops dropping.

Elude: You’ve escaped from the hold and may move into any adjacent sector of your choice.

Hold: You’re firmly holding your opponent. For every Turn you maintain the hold your opponent suffers a number of points of damage equal to your Brawn Rank Value.

Nail: This is a called ranged attack on a specific target. It is used for feats of marksmanship such as severing a rope with an arrow or shooting a gun out of someone’s hand; it deals damage to the target like a normal hit The attacker must state the intention to try for this result before rolling the attack. If a Nail is not declared before the dice are rolled this result is treated as a Hit. The Gamemaster has the final say on the effect of a successful Nail attack result.

Pound: Compare the Rank Values of the attacker and defender’s Brawn. If the attacker’s Rank Value is greater than the defender’s the defender rolls d% on the Master Table using Fortitude. Compare the result to the following table:

Color Result
Black The defender is knocked down and into an adjacent sector of the attacker’s choice. The defender must spend next turn getting up and can perform no other action. If there’s an obstacle between the chosen sector and the defender’s current sector; and if the attacker’s Brawn is greater than the Material Value of the obstacle (see p. 00), the defender is knocked through the obstacle.
Red The defender is knocked down in the currently occupied sector. The defender must spend next turn getting up and can perform no other action.
Blue No effect.
Yellow No effect.

Shatter: Unfortunately you grabbed the object a little too hard and broke it. If the object could possibly injure someone or something, such as a gun, the Gamemaster should roll randomly to determine which character – or important item – in the sector or adjacent sectors was harmed.

Snatch: You’ve grabbed the object in question and wrested it from your opponent.

Turnabout: You’ve not only escaped your opponent’s hold but can also place your own Hold on the opponent or move to an adjacent sector instead.